lunes, 30 de septiembre de 2019

IKE Completes Final Pre-Deployment Test

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 28, 2019) The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) transits the Atlantic Ocean with ships assigned to Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 and aircraft assigned to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 during a photo exercise to conclude Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) as part of the basic phase of the Optimized Fleet Response Plan. 
U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tony D. Curtis.

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Marques Franklin,
ATLANTIC OCEAN (NNS) (NNS) -- The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) took another step toward becoming a deployment-ready naval vessel, after returning to Norfolk upon completion of Tailored Ship's Training Availability/Final Evaluation Problem (TSTA/FEP) Sept. 29.
“Ike Sailors have done it,” said Capt. Kyle Higgins, Ike’s commanding officer. “Through a mixture of patience, determination and perseverance, the Sailors of our mighty ship and the rest of the Ike Carrier Strike Group (CSG) completed our first Basic Phase work-up. We hold ourselves to the highest standard and push for perfection.”
TSTA/FEP is a training assessment that tests the ship’s ability to integrate with other assets within CSG 10, including the ships assigned to Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 and the aircraft attached to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3.
The evolution was graded by Commander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic (CNAL) and Afloat Training Group (ATG) Atlantic, who embarked aboard the aircraft carrier for its latest underway.
In addition to working through the ship’s ability to integrate with other assets, numerous drills and exercises were performed to test the crew and its own level of readiness. These included mass casualty evolutions, shipboard firefighting, simulated man overboard, and various flight operations scenarios.
Over 15 separate training teams assisted in ensuring that the ship’s crew was battle-tested and ready for the evaluators to come aboard.
"Every member of every training team fully embraced their training responsibilities, and the crew performed at the highest levels" said Lt. Cmdr. Jamie Drage, the ship’s training officer. "We have made tremendous progress in a fast-paced training cycle, and our readiness is a direct reflection of the hard work and dedication of our Sailors."
To date, Ike has accomplished 98% of Basic Phase graded requirements. The Ike has also totaled 91 days at sea and conducted approximately 2,400 aircraft sorties.
The next step for IKE will be the Integrated Phase of the Optimized Fleet Response Plan, followed by Composite Unit Training Exercise (COMPTUEX), which will test all warfare mission areas of the ship and CSG-10..
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sábado, 28 de septiembre de 2019

Coast Guard Cutter returns to Boston after offloading over 12,000 pounds of cocaine

The Coast Guard Cutter Seneca (WMEC-906) crew underway on the Eastern Pacific Ocean. The cutter Seneca is the sixth of thirteen 270' Famous Class medium endurance cutters in the United States Coast Guard fleet. Home ported in Boston's historic North End, SENECA moors within a short walk of such landmarks as the Old North Church, Faneuil Hall, USS CONSTITUTION, and TD Garden - Home of the Celtics and Bruins.  
CoastGuard Photo.

BOSTON — The​ U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Seneca returned home to Boston after a 93-day patrol in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, Friday, Sept. 27.

Seneca intercepted three drug smuggling vessels transporting cocaine from South America bound for the United States. The interdictions during this patrol resulted in the apprehension of nine suspected narcotics traffickers and more​ than​ 12,000 pounds of cocaine with a street value of nearly $174 million dollars.​
Bales of cocaine lie in the hull of a suspected smuggling vessel intercepted by the crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Seneca in international waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean August 17, 2019. The seizure of the contraband was one of three interdictions by the crew during a patrol of drug transit zones off the coast of Central and South America. 
U.S. Coast Guard photo.

"Counter-drug operations are a vital component to the Coast Guard and Department of Homeland Security's mission and our national security," said Cmdr. John Christensen, commanding officer of the cutter Seneca. "I am exceptionally proud of this crew who, over the course of the last three months, rose above the challenges of conducting operations at sea, persevered through many personal sacrifices and showed an unwavering dedication to serving our nation."

Throughout the patrol, Seneca rescued 22 Haitian Migrants, conducted joint exercises with the Honduran Navy, transited the Panama Canal, and spent several months combating illicit narcotics smuggling across the Eastern Pacific Ocean with a deployed armed Coast Guard helicopter team from Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron (HITRON) Jacksonville.
The Coast Guard Cutter Seneca (WMEC-906) crew offloaded more than 12,000 pounds of cocaine Sept. 20, 2019 at Coast Guard Sector Miami. The drugs were interdicted in international waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean off the coasts of Mexico, Central and South America, including contraband seized and recovered by multiple Coast Guard cutter crews in more than a dozen interdictions of suspected drug smuggling vessels. 
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Jonathan Lally.

These interdictions were in support of Operation Martillo, a regional​ initiative targeting illicit trafficking that threatens security and​ prosperity at the national, regional, and international levels.

Coast Guard Cutter Seneca is a 270-foot Medium Endurance Cutter with a crew complement of 100.​ Seneca missions include counter-narcotics, migrant interdiction, search and rescue and living marine resource operations from the Gulf of Maine to the Pacific Ocean.

For more information and video from Seneca's offload, click here.

-USCG-

miércoles, 25 de septiembre de 2019

Coast Guard Cutter Valiant interdicts self-propelled semi-submersible in the Eastern Pacific

U.S. Coast Guard boarding team members climb aboard a suspected smuggling vessel in September. Crews intercepted a drug-laden, 40-foot self-propelled semi-submersible (SPSS) in the Eastern Pacific carrying approximately 12,000 pounds of cocaine, worth over $165 million and apprehended four suspected drug smugglers. 
U.S. Coast Guard Photo.

JACKSONVILLE— The Coast Guard Cutter Valiant crew intercepted a drug-laden, 40-foot self-propelled semi-submersible (SPSS) in the Eastern Pacific. 

While on routine patrol in the Eastern Pacific, Valiant’s crew interdicted a self-propelled semi-submersible in international waters carrying approximately 12,000 pounds of cocaine, worth over $165 million and apprehended four suspected drug smugglers.

The semi-submersible was originally detected and monitored by maritime patrol aircraft (MPA), and the Valiant crew was diverted by Joint Interagency Task Force South (JIATF-S) to interdict the semi-submersible, arriving after sunset. The Valiant crew launched two small boats with boarding teams made up of Valiant crew and two members of the Coast Guard Pacific Tactical Law Enforcement Team, successfully interdicting the semi-submersible in the early morning hours, who subsequently led and conducted a full law enforcement boarding with the assistance of Colombian Naval assets that arrived on scene shortly after.

Members of a U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Valiant boarding team transfer narcotics between an interceptor boat and a suspected smuggling vessel in September. Crews intercepted a drug-laden, 40-foot self-propelled semi-submersible (SPSS) in the Eastern Pacific carrying approximately 12,000 pounds of cocaine, worth over $165 million and apprehended four suspected drug smugglers. 
U.S. Coast Guard Photo.

Approximately over 1,100 pounds of cocaine were recovered and offloaded to the Valiant during the operations. The remaining cocaine on the semi-submersible could not be safely extracted due to stability concerns of the vessel. The joint boarding successfully stopped a drug smuggling vessel and also strengthened international relations and communications between the two partner nations.

According to Valiant’s commanding officer, the interdiction coincided with a time-honored mariner’s milestone and tradition of crossing the equator which made both events even more meaningful part of the ship’s patrol.

Bales of cocaine seized from a suspected smuggling vessel lie on the deck of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Valiant in September. Crews intercepted a drug-laden, 40-foot self-propelled semi-submersible (SPSS) in the Eastern Pacific carrying approximately 12,000 pounds of cocaine, worth over $165 million and apprehended four suspected drug smugglers. 
U.S. Coast Guard Photo.

"There are no words to describe the feeling Valiant crew is experiencing right now,” said Cmdr. Matthew Waldron, Valiant’s Commanding Officer. “In a 24-hour period, the crew both crossed the equator and intercepted a drug-laden self-propelled semi-submersible vessel. Each in and of hemselves is momentous events in any cutterman's career. Taken together, however, it is truly emarkably unprecedented This interdiction was an all-hands-on-deck evolution, and each crew member performed above and beyond the call of duty. Additionally, we could not have successfully completed this interdiction without the love and support of our families back home, many of whom evacuated from Jacksonville this week for Hurricane Dorian. To the Valiant families, a heartfelt ‘Thank You!’”

The Valiant is a multi-mission 210-foot Medium-Endurance Cutter commissioned in 1967. Missions include search and rescue, maritime law enforcement, marine environmental protection, homeland security, and national defense operations.

For more information on CGC Valiant, visit http://www.uscg.mil/lantarea/cgcValiant

-USCG-

martes, 24 de septiembre de 2019

Coast Guard rescues 5 people from the water offshore Gulfport, Mississippi

A response boatcrew from Coast Guard Station Gulfport, Mississippi, stands with survivors they rescued from the water after the their vessel capsized offshore Gulfport Harbor Sept. 21, 2019. The boat crew transported the five people to Station Gulfport in stable condition. 
U.S. Coast Guard courtesy photo/Released.

NEW ORLEANS – The Coast Guard rescued five people who went into the water after their vessel capsized in Mississippi Sound, Saturday.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Mobile, Alabama, received a report at 2:55 p.m. Saturday that an unknown number of people went into the water after a vessel capsized approximately 2 miles south of Gulfport Harbor.

Sector watchstanders directed the launch of a 45-Foot Response Boat-Medium crew from Coast Guard Station Gulfport to rescue the people.

A good Samaritan aboard a personal watercraft rescued six of the 11 people.

The Coast Guard boatcrew arrived on scene at 3:36 p.m., rescued the remaining five people and transported them to Station Gulfport in stable condition.

-USCG-

viernes, 20 de septiembre de 2019

Coast Guard Cutter Seneca to offload more than 12,000 pounds of cocaine in Miami

The Coast Guard Cutter Seneca (WMEC-906) crew underway on the Eastern Pacific Ocean, Sept. 22, 2018. The cutter Seneca is the sixth of thirteen 270' Famous Class medium endurance cutters in the United States Coast Guard fleet. Home ported in Boston's historic North End, SENECA moors within a short walk of such landmarks as the Old North Church, Faneuil Hall, USS CONSTITUTION, and TD Garden - Home of the Celtics and Bruins. 
U.S. Coast Guard Photo.

The Coast Guard Cutter Seneca (WMEC-906) crew is scheduled to offload more than 12,000 pounds of cocaine Friday at Coast Guard Sector Miami.

The drugs were interdicted in international waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean off the coasts of Mexico, Central and South America, including contraband seized and recovered in over a dozen interdictions of suspected drug smuggling vessels by U.S. Coast Guard cutters:
"These down range counter-drug operations are a vital component to the Coast Guard and Department of Homeland Security's mission and our national security. These operations enable us to extend our maritime borders, weaken the economic engine of Transnational Criminal Organizations, contribute to enhancing stability and security across our partner nations within Central America, and they combat the drug epidemic within our local communities," said Cmdr. John Christensen, commanding officer of the cutter Seneca. "I am exceptionally proud of this crew.  Over the course of the last three months they rose above the challenges of conducting operations at sea, persevered through many personal sacrifices and showed an unwavering dedication to serving our nation."

The cutter Seneca’s crew along with those of the other ships conducted operations targeting transnational criminal organizations in conjunction with Joint Interagency Task Force-South, Department of Defense, Customs and Border Protection, Department of Justice, and a number of other Coast Guard aircraft. The cutter Seneca’s presence and efforts are critical to disrupting and dismantling the transnational criminal organizations that attempt to smuggle these drugs through the ocean and into Central and North America.

The cutter Seneca is a 270-foot medium endurance cutter homeported in Boston. The cutter Tahoma is a 270-foot medium endurance cutter homeported in Kittery, Maine. The cutter Midgett is a 418-foot national security cutter homeported in Honolulu. The cutter Valiant is a 210-foot medium endurance cutter homeported in Jacksonville, Florida. 

For more breaking news follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

-USCG-

jueves, 19 de septiembre de 2019

Coast Guard to set Port Condition X-RAY for the ports in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands due to Tropical Storm Jerry

SAN JUAN – The Coast Guard Captain of the Port San Juan anticipates setting Port Condition X-RAY at 8 p.m. Wednesday for the ports in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgins Islands due to the possibility of sustained gale force winds greater than 39 mph from Tropical Storm Jerry arriving to the area within 48 hours.

The Coast Guard strongly cautions the maritime community to remain vigilant and take the necessary precautions as Tropical Storm Jerry approaches Eastern Caribbean waters.
During Port Condition X-RAY port facilities are currently open to all commercial traffic and all cargo transfer operations at Coast Guard regulated facilities may continue while X-RAY remains in effect.

All ocean-going commercial vessels greater than 500 gross tons should make plans for departing the port no later than the setting of Port Condition YANKEE. Mariners are reminded there are no safe havens in these facilities, and ports are safest when the inventory of vessels is at a minimum.

Vessels desiring to remain in port must immediately contact the COTP to receive permission and are required to submit a safe mooring plan in writing. Vessels bound for the U.S. Virgin Islands or Puerto Rico unable to depart 24 hours prior to threatening winds making landfall are advised to seek an alternate destination.

Recreational boaters are advised to seek safe harbor. Maritime and port facilities are reminded to review and update their heavy weather response plans and make any additional preparations needed to adequately prepare in case of a potential impact to the area. Mariners can view the latest port updates on the Coast Guard’s Homeport site for Sector San Juan.

The Coast Guard advises public and recreational boaters of safety messages:

Secure belongings.  Owners of large boats are urged to move their vessels to inland marinas where they will be less vulnerable to breaking free of their moorings or to sustaining damage. Trailer-able boats should be taken out of the water and stored in a place not prone to flooding.  Those who are leaving their boats in the water are reminded to remove EPIRBs and to secure life rings, lifejackets and small boats. These items, if not properly secured, can break free and require valuable search and rescue resources be diverted to ensure people are not in distress.

Stay clear of beaches. Wave heights and currents typically increase before a storm makes landfall. Even the best swimmers can fall victim to the strong waves and rip currents caused by hurricanes.  Swimmers should stay clear of beaches until local lifeguards and law enforcement officials say the water is safe.

Be prepared. Area residents should be prepared by developing a family plan, creating a disaster supply kit, having a place to go, securing their home and having a plan for pets. Information can be found at the National Hurricane Center’s website.

Stay informed. The public should monitor the progress and strength of the storm through local television, radio and Internet. Boaters can monitor its progress on VHF radio channel 16. Information can also be obtained on small craft advisories and warnings on VHF radio channel 16.

For the latest forecast advisories and weather updates for Tropical Storm Jerry visit the National Hurricane Center website.

For more breaking news follow us on Twitter.

-USCG-

viernes, 13 de septiembre de 2019

East Coast Surface Action Group Deploys

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Aug. 1, 2019) The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Lassen (DDG 82) transits the Atlantic Ocean. Lassen is underway conducting a composite training unit exercise with the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group. 
U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Tamara Vaughn/Released.

From U.S. 2nd Fleet Public Affairs
NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) - Ships and units from the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group formed a Surface Action Group (SAG) and are deploying from their East Coast homeports of Norfolk, VA, and Mayport, FL, over the next several days.
Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Lassen (DDG 82) departed Mayport today, and will be joined by USS Farragut (DDG 99) and Norfolk-based Ticronderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Normandy (CG 60) and guided-missile destroyer USS Forrest Sherman (DDG 98) in coming days. The command staff of Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 28 will lead the SAG, which also includes embarked helicopter detachments from Helicopter Maritime Squadron (HSM) 72, from Naval Air Station Jacksonville.
“This deployment demonstrates our Navy’s inherent capability to maneuver and flex to accomplish the task at hand,” said Vice Adm. Andrew Lewis, commander, U.S. 2nd Fleet. “Our ships remain flexible, ready and capable to operate in multiple theaters supporting a variety of missions.”
The scheduled deployment enables the Navy to rotate forces on station in order to sustain support to Combatant commanders. The SAG, made up of approximately 1200 Sailors, is trained and prepared to conduct high-end combat operations, routine patrols, maritime security operations, and theater security cooperation activities to enhance regional security and stability.
“We have an important mission ahead,” said Capt. Jennifer Couture, commodore, Destroyer Squadron 28. “SAG operations allow the Commander tremendous flexibility and responsiveness in the types of missions that can be conducted, and geographic reach into varied and diverse areas. The SAG ships are ready and able to support a variety of exercises and missions with our partners and allies in support of maritime stability and security around the globe.”
In August, the Navy announced an emergent maintenance requirement for an electrical issue aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). The aircraft carrier’s repairs are progressing, and all efforts are being made to deploy the carrier and air wing as soon as possible.

lunes, 9 de septiembre de 2019

Coast Guard medevacs diver 57 miles offshore Galveston, Texas

An Air Station Houston MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew transfers a diver suffering from possible decompression sickness to Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center personnel in Houston, Texas, Sep. 8, 2019. The diver was reported to be in stable condition. 
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Air Station Houston.

HOUSTON — The Coast Guard medevaced a diver from a recreational vessel 57 miles offshore Galveston, Texas, Sunday.

At 2:58 p.m, Sector Houston-Galveston watchstanders received a report that a 53-year-old man aboard a recreational vessel was suffering from possible decompression sickness.

An Air Station Houston MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew was launched to the scene.

The Dolphin helicopter crew hoisted and transferred the diver to awaiting emergency medical services personnel at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center.

The diver was reported to be in stable condition.

U.S. Coast Guard photo by Air Station Houston.

-USCG-

Coast Guard recovers 2 deceased from downed aircraft incident in Marathon

Pictured is a plane wreckage half a mile north of Marathon airport, Sept. 8, 2019. A station Marathon 33-foot Special Purpose Craft-Law Enforcement crew arrived on scene, confirmed the debris was from a Cessna high wing single engine plane that had left from the airport, recovered two deceased persons and transferred them an awaiting the Monroe County Sheriff's Office medical examiner. 
Coast Guard Photo.

KEY WEST, Fla. — The Coast Guard recovered two bodies from a downed aircraft incident half a mile north of Marathon Airport, Sunday.

Coast Guard Sector Key West watchstanders received a call from a good Samaritan of a debris field from a possible downed aircraft north of Marathon Airport. Watchstanders diverted an Air Station Miami HC-144 Ocean Sentry airplane crew, Coast Guard Auxiliary Tiger 1 airplane crew and launched a Coast Guard Station Marathon 33-foot Special Purpose Craft—Law Enforcement crew. The Station Marathon boatcrew arrived on scene, confirmed the debris was from a Cessna high wing single engine plane that had left from the airport, recovered two deceased persons and transferred them an awaiting Monroe County Sheriff's Office medical examiner.

For more breaking news follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

-USCG-

jueves, 5 de septiembre de 2019

Coast Guard continues response efforts in Bahamas due to Hurricane Dorian

Coast Guard personnel help medevac a patient in the Bahamas during Hurricane Dorian. The Coast Guard is supporting the Bahamian National Emergency Management Agency and the Royal Bahamian Defense Force with hurricane response efforts. 
U.S. Coast Guard Photo.

MIAMI — Coast Guard Hurricane Dorian response operations are underway in support of the Bahamas. As of Wednesday at at 10 a.m.: 
  • Coast Guard crews from across the Coast Guard have rescued 61 people and rescued four pets in the Bahamas since Hurricane Dorian began.
  • The Coast Guard is currently conducting air operations based out of Andros Island, Bahamas.
  • Port Condition Zulu is set for the Port of Palm Beach
  • Port Condition Four for the Ports of Fort Pierce, Port of Miami and Port Everglades.
  • Port Condition Four for the Port of Key West
  • Port Condition Zulu is in effect for the ports of Jacksonville, Fernandina and Port Canaveral Florida.
  • Port Condition Zulu is in effect for the Port of Savannah and Brunswick, Georgia. 
  • Port Condition Zulu is in effect for the Port of Charleston, South Carolina. 
  • The Coast Guard has three cutters actively engaged in Hurricane Dorian response efforts in the Bahamas.
  • There are 17 shallow-water rescue boat teams standing by to respond to Hurricane Dorian.
The Coast Guard is supporting the Bahamian National Emergency Management Agency and the Royal Bahamian Defense Force, who are leading search and rescue efforts in the Bahamas. If you are in a life-threatening situation and need assistance, call 911 or 919 in the Bahamas, or call the Bahamian National Emergency Management Agency at 242-325-9983 or the Bahamian Emergency Operations Center at 242-362-3895 or 242-362-3896.

Our forces are strategically positioned to be clear of the impact of the storm and then immediately will reconstitute those forces for rescue operations and re-opening of our critical ports infrastructure.

During Port Condition Four, port facilities are currently open to all commercial vessel traffic and port transfer operations may continue.

During Port Condition Zulu, no vessels may enter or transit within ports without permission of the COTP. All vessel movements are prohibited, and all ship-to-shore operations must cease.

For more breaking news follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

-USCG-

Navy Evacuates Five North Carolina Counties Ahead of Dorian, Warns Units Statewide to Expect High Winds

NORFOLK (Sept. 4, 2019) Ships begin to depart Naval Station Norfolk to avoid effects from Hurricane Dorian. This departure follows the announcement of Sortie Condition Alpha by Commander, U.S. 2nd Fleet. (U.S. Navy photo by Breanna Scales/Released).

NORFOLK, Virginia (NNS) -- The Navy issued an emergency evacuation order today for all Navy personnel and dependents in five North Carolina counties, in advance of the arrival of high winds and heavy rain expected from Hurricane Dorian.
Active-duty service members and their dependents, reservists on active duty and their dependents, Department of Defense and Department of the Navy employees, and authorized escorts for dependents or civilian employees residing in the following North Carolina counties, where mandatory evacuations have been ordered in conjunction with Hurricane Dorian:
•    Hyde County (all residents including the Town of Ocracoke)
•    Dare County (all residents)
•    Carteret County (residents in the Town of Beaufort only)
•    Currituck County (mandatory evacuation of Currituck Outer Banks)
•    New Hanover County (mandatory evacuations for residents of Carolina Beach, Kure Beach, Wrightsville Beach and Figure Eight Island)
Additionally, Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic (CNRMA) ordered all U.S. Navy units/activities in the state of North Carolina at or east of the Raleigh-Durham metro area to prepare for possible sustained destructive winds of greater than 50 knots within the next 12 hours, thereby setting Tropical Cyclone Conditions of Readiness (TCCOR) One (I).
“The safety of our personnel and their families is our top priority,” said Rear Adm. Charles Rock, Commander, Navy Region Mid-Atlantic. “Our mission is to provide support to the Fleet, Fighter and Family. Keep in mind that roadways, interstates and highways may be congested as residents travel to their respective safe haven. I ask that everyone traveling please keep safety in mind and remember to muster with their chain of command when they reach their safe haven.”
Personnel should contact local county officials to verify specific areas currently under mandatory evacuations to ensure they have the most up-to-date information prior to traveling. Reimbursement is only authorized for specific areas under mandatory evacuation.
Parent commands must determine whether the individual(s) should evacuate and should consider whether the location is covered under a disaster or emergency declaration issued by the federal or state government due to Hurricane Dorian, and whether the location being evacuated is covered under a mandatory or voluntary evacuation order issued by a competent civilian authority.
Active duty service members in Navy units may be issued Temporary Duty (TDY) or Permanent Change of Station (PCS) orders, but are not considered in an evacuation status. 
Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) claimancy evacuees are authorized to proceed within 500 miles of the designated remote safe haven area of Asheville, N.C. 
Non-CNIC claimancy evacuees covered under this evacuation directive should proceed to the remote safe haven area designated by their parent chain of command.
Individuals evacuating under this authority must be issued individual orders by their parent command. Parent commands must verify that criteria is met in advance of issuing orders. Eligible personnel are reminded that they do not need to wait for individual evacuation orders before evacuating. Individual orders can be issued by the parent command once evacuees reach their respective safe haven.
Reimbursement for lodging and per diem will be at the approved rate for the designated safe haven. Costs incurred by an evacuee for travel conducted without authorization away from the designated safe haven are the sole responsibility of the evacuee. Funding for military and civilian personnel is the responsibility of the parent command. Line of accounting for dependents and any authorized escort will be provided separately. Reimbursement eligible expenses must have occurred within the specified timeframe and may not exceed the authorization provided.
All personnel and their families should review their Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS) account (https://navyfamily.navy.mil) information. Personnel unable to contact their parent command may report their status through the NFAAS website or call (877) 414-05358. To assist a family during the storm, a NFAAS needs assessment module must be activated to assist the impacted personnel, document their status, and request assistance, if needed.
Personnel should visit the Ready Navy website at https://ready.navy.mil and maintain situational awareness through regular communication with their parent chain of command.

martes, 3 de septiembre de 2019

Coast Guard responds to Hurricane Dorian aftermath in Marsh Harbour

Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater forward deployed MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crews medevac seven critical patients from the Marsh Harbour Clinic to Nassau, Bahamas for further medical care. As Hurricane Dorian makes it way across the Bahamas, the Coast Guard is ready to assist as needed. (U.S. Coast Guard photo).

MIAMI — Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crews, forward deployed to Andros Island, medevaced 19 people from the Marsh Harbour Clinic to Nassau International Airport, Monday.

Four Jayhawk aircrews completed five medical evacuations of 19 people, ranging in ages from children to elderly, from the Marsh Harbour clinic to Nassau emergency medical personnel at the Nassau International Airport in various medical conditions.

As Hurricane Dorian began to make it’s way toward the Bahamas, the Coast Guard pre-positioned several surface assets in Key West and positioned Jayhawk helicopter crews on Andros Island to be able to respond to the devastation created by Hurricane Dorian.

The Coast Guard plans to continue it’s search in the Bahamas at first light Tuesday.

For more breaking news follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

-USCG-

Coast Guard medevacs woman from cruise ship off Manasquan Inlet, New Jersey

MH-65 Dolphin rescue helicopter.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by crew of CGC Willow (archive).

PHILADELPHIA — The Coast Guard medevaced a woman from a cruise ship after she was reportedly having medical complications approximately 40 miles east of Manasquan Inlet, New Jersey Sunday night.

Watchstanders at Sector Delaware Bay command center were contacted at 9:54 p.m. by a crewmember on the cruise ship Norwegian Escape and notified that the 39-yer-old woman was having issues and needed medical attention.

An aircrew aboard a MH-65 Dolphin helicopter from Air Station Atlantic City launched to assist.

Once on scene, the crew hoisted up the woman and her husband and transported them to AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center in Pomona New Jersey.

-USCG-